Using cameras and artificial intelligence systems to reduce forest fires

According to environmental and meteorological experts, this is the most heat-free summer, which foreshadows an environmental disaster for forest fires.
Last year saw catastrophic global forest fires, most of which were California forest fires in the United States.
Leaving behind dozens of dead, hundreds of destroyed homes and thousands of hectares of burnt farmland.
According to the publication of the site, "Digital Journal" on Friday, US firefighters are preparing for the expected fire this year with sophisticated camera systems equipped with artificial intelligence systems.
IBM has developed a new system of fire monitoring systems called "Bee2FireDetection" that can help detect the growing forest fires early on.
This system can help firefighters distribute resources better and take proactive steps to ensure that small sparks do not turn into larger fires.
"Early detection is the key. If you're fighting a fire in the first 20 minutes, you're likely not going to face huge, devastating fires, which means you can contain the situation and get out with minimal damage," said Vasco Correa, chief business officer at Bee2FireDetection.
Bee2FireDetection uses three different types of camera. The first is an HD optical camera that uses artificial intelligence to identify smoke columns and monitor light variations.
The second camera, is a thermal infrared camera, monitors the temperatures that suggest the start of the fire.
The third camera, spectral decomposition and smoke columns are classified by analysis of chemical components.
"We can determine whether the smoke column comes from forest fires, a smoke-like cloud, or a dirt cloud," Correa said.
This three-pronged approach helps avoid potential misconceptions, because erroneous communications remain a problem, because firefighters, who go to a fake fire site, can waste the time and resources spent better elsewhere.
The system can also pull weather data from IBM's IBM-owned Weather Company to predict the probability of fire in a particular area and how the fire can spread if it occurs. This information can be very useful for making key strategic decisions.
"As the forest fires have increased by 400 percent since the 1970s, the current strategies simply have not been successful," said Korea.
Currently, the Bee2FireDetection system is running in Brazil and Portugal, so far, and has not been used in the United States.